Posts Tagged ‘yohimbine’

HOW DOES VIAGRA DIFFER FROM OTHER IMPOTENCE TREATMENTS?

// October 25th, 2010 // No Comments » // Impotence

Viagra Is Not an Aphrodisiac

Currently available impotence treatments all work in different ways to help man acquire an erection. For example, yohimbine (Yocon, Yohimex) has been thought of as an aphrodisiac, a medication that increases a man’s libido or sexual desire. Viagra does not increase sexual desire.

Sexual Stimulation Required

Some impotence treatments like intrapenile papaverine, alprostadil (Caverject) injection, or MUSE (medicated urethral suppository) will allow a man to have an erection in the absence of any sexual stimulation. Indeed, men who opt for penile injection or MUSE therapy can experience penile swelling and a full erection within twenty to thirty minutes after their first treatment in the asexual, antiseptic environment of a doctor’s office. It is likely that both intrapenile injections and MUSE work by increasing levels of intrapenile NO and cGMP, directly bypassing the normal mechanisms involved in a sexually stimulated erection. There is, however, a difference between the erections men have after Viagra and sexual stimulation and intrapenile injection or MUSE therapy.

Priapism Is Uncommon After Viagra

The erection triggered by both intrapenile injections and MUSE does not always fade spontaneously after ejaculation. This results in a serious medical problem: a persistent painful erection called priapism. Unfortunately, priapism occurs with distressing frequency in men using penile injection or MUSE. Priapism is less common but can occur in a handful of Viagra-treated men. Priapism, whether caused by intrapenile injection, MUSE, or after Viagra use, is considered a medical emergency. Men whose erection lasts for more than four hours require immediate medical treatment. Fortunately, for the majority of men the effect of Viagra is not sustained beyond the moment of ejaculation.Thus, because of Viagra’s gentle action in turning on and allowing nature to turn off male sexual chemistry, Viagra seemed to be an ideal medication to use for men with erectile dysfunction.

Male Sexual Chemistry and Viagra

// October 25th, 2010 // No Comments » // Impotence

From the moment Viagra came on the market, men, and women, too, have been intrigued by this new “potency pill.” In this chapter, you will find answers to many of the commonly asked questions about Viagra.

1. What is so special about Viagra?
2. Understanding male sexual chemistry: What makes Viagra work?
3. How does Viagra differ from other impotence treatments?
4. Is Viagra effective for every impotent man?
5. What are the side effects of Viagra?
6. Is there reason to fear Viagra?
7. Death after sex and/or Viagra: What is the risk?
8. What are the fantasies, fears, and reality of philandering after Viagra?
9. Can Viagra take the worry out of sex?
10. How can Viagra be used for maximum benefit and minimal risk?
11. The politics of male sexuality: Who will pay for Viagra?
12. Does Viagra work for women?
13. What’s next after Viagra?

His Cheshire cat smile, renewed vigor in stride, and different gaze — firm, straight-ahead, no longer oblique or downcast — tells me what I want to know before Michael opens his mouth.

“It worked!”

Eager to elaborate, he went on: “I took the pill around 9 P.M., watched a little TV, then in the middle of the 10 o’clock news decided to join my wife on the couch and started in like when we were first dating.”

“I’m waiting to hear the weather, she protested.”

“This will be more interesting than the weather,” I insisted, feeling myself starting to swell.”

“What’s gotten into you?” she wanted to know.”

“I’ll tell you later.”

Before long our clothes were off, we were in the bedroom, and my penis was firm. Then the more we played, the firmer it became. I could not remember the last time I was this powerful or excited. The more we played, the harder it got, and when we made love, it was exciting and wonderful, like it was before I had, you know my problem. Now I feel like a new man,” Michael enthused.

Michael and millions of men just like him, once impotent and fearful of entering into any sexual activity because of lingering doubts about whether they would be able to “perform” during sexual intimacy, can now look forward to enjoying sex once again, all because of a tiny blue pill.

In the past “the Pill” referred only to the oral contraceptive birth control pill. That “Pill” liberated women, allowing them to enjoy sex and be sexually active without fear of pregnancy. The new “Pill” is equally revolutionary because it deciphers the mystique of a man’s sexuality.

Maybe it was inevitable. Sooner or later someone had to solve the riddle of a man’s unique sexual chemistry. Once doctors knew what controls a man’s sexual urges and his ability to have sexual intercourse, they believed they would know all there was to know about men’s sexuality. For too many years, everyone, scientists and public included, attributed all male behavior to too much or too little testosterone. Now we know that testosterone is still important, even vital, for many male directed sexual behaviors. Indeed, today we have a better and much more sophisticated understanding of the promises and perils of this prototype male hormone.  But testosterone alone is not the whole story.

Men’s sexual chemistry depends on even more. Once scientists understood the chemical reactions involved in the transformation of a man’s penis from limp to erect, they could develop a “designer potency pill.” The goal was to recharge a man’s sexual batteries and make it possible for a man who, for one reason or another, had lost the ability to have sex to reclaim his manhood. Such a pill would allow a sexually impaired man to feel confident about his ability to have erections and take pleasure in sexual intercourse once again.

Over the years, many pills containing yohimbine, vitamin E, and zinc were hawked as male restoratives. Many are still used to bolster a man’s sexual appetite and power and continue to enjoy great popularity today. However, none of these oral medications achieved the immediate stardom or instantaneous success of sildenafil (Viagra).

From the beginning, the buzz on Viagra was extraordinary, like that for no other new drug in the history of medicine. Viagra’s FDA approval shouldered aside, at least temporarily, the public’s obsession with President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. The prestigious column-one slot in the New York Times was devoted to FDA approval of this pill to treat impotence. Every major newspaper and news magazine followed suit, and overnight Viagra became a household word.