COMPOUNDING PHARMACIES

COMPOUNDING PHARMACIES

COMPOUNDING PHARMACIES

When it comes to getting your prescription filled, you have more than one option: you can go to a standard pharmacy or drugstore, or you can go to a compounding pharmacy. A compounding pharmacy prepares a specialized drug product to fulfill an individual’s specific needs that cannot be met by a standard prescription.
For example: if you have difficulty swallowing a tablet or capsule, you can get your prescription prepared into a solution. Many drugs contain dyes and fillers such as lactose (e.g., decongestants, antibiotics) that can cause allergic reactions in a small percentage of people. If you are one of those people, you can get a compounding pharmacist to prepare your prescription without the offending ingredient. And if your child refuses to take a bad-tasting medication, flavoring it with cherry or grape can make the medicine go down.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) defined the limits of legitimate compounding under the FDA Modernization Act of 1997. However, although compounding pharmacists begin with an FDA-approved drug, changes they make to any given drug may convert an approved drug into an unapproved one. That means there is the potential for reactions to occur between ingredients because of the change that was made.

Compounding pharmacies are an option. Pharmacist and former FDA pharmacy compounding steering committee member Robert Tonelli said, “Whenever possible, FDA would recommend that patients use an approved drug. We have more data and reporting requirements on those to assure us of their safety and effectiveness.”

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